Thanksgiving Part 1

So, this has been a little bit of a frustrating weekend, and before I start into my post proper there’s something that I need to put down, just to get it out of my head. I met a young woman last week, lovely lady and clearly intelligent. This was the second time that I’d met her, but the first time that I really spent significant time talking with her. After some excellent conversation about the sociological messages in Ender’s Game and Keynesian Economics, I asked her if she’d like to get dinner with me, and she said that she would very much enjoy that. I ran into her again the next day, though not for long, and on Saturday I called her to figure out a time to get dinner. I caught her at work, and she asked if she could call me back. She never did. I texted her later that night, just in case she’d been waiting for me to call her. No response. I called her again this evening, and she didn’t pick up. If I’m going to be completely truthful, which is my goal here, this young woman has lost most all of my respect, and it’s going to take a truly excellent excuse to get it back.

Now, it’s entirely possible that she’s lost her phone somewhere and is panicking about not being able to get in touch with me. However, I can’t say that I expect this. I’ve mentioned before that women have, quite often, given me the ‘yes means no’ treatment, and I have no doubt that I’m not the only male that this has happened to. Honestly, this is, in part at least, what leads me to the general conclusion that there are no honest women. Even the best women pull this kind of stuff, and it just leaves me with the impression that ‘honesty’ as an actual concept has no meaning to the female mind. As far as I can tell, women in general lie by rote. They don’t even consider it lying. I can remember, when I was in college, girls telling each other that ‘when a guy who isn’t that interesting or attractive asks you out, just say yes and then give him the phone number for the campus police’. Apparently this was funny, but honestly I just find the incredible lack of honesty and compassion appalling.

That being said, I told flowergirl this morning that we are to be thankful for everything that happens in our lives. We thank God for the wonderful, pleasant, nice things (of course, that’s easy), but we also thank God for the tears, the lies, and the hurts that are a part of everyday life. This is a part of trusting God. As I’ve said before, if I only trust God to do the things that I want him to do, then I’m not really trusting him. I’m trusting myself. Real trust begins when God starts doing things that we don’t understand, or that we don’t want, and real trust is thankful for those things: not just after I understand what they were leading to, but during the trials themselves. Real trust in God thanks him for this girl who led me on a wild goose chase. Real trust thanks him for the terror I feel every time I look at taking the next step towards applying to Southeastern. Real trust thanks God when I don’t have the money to pay my electric bill (I do right now, just an example… I’ve been there in the past though).

My point here is that when we really trust God, then we thank him for everything that he allows in our lives precisely because we trust him. We know that ‘God uses all things for good for those who are called according to his purpose… because they are predestined to be conformed to the image of his son’ (Romans 8:28-29… I’ve paraphrased a bit). The goal of sanctification is Christlikeness, and Christlikeness does not come easily. It doesn’t come through comfort and luxury, and it doesn’t generally look like a malibu sunrise (either the drink or the place). Honestly, most of the time it looks a little bit more like Sarajevo during the civil war. It’s rough, painful, dangerous, and generally doesn’t make any sense. That’s good. That’s where we’re supposed to be. So, let’s thank God for it.

The Pursuit of Life

One of my bible professors died a couple of days ago. It wasn’t unexpected in any way, but it’s still surprising. That’s probably a little bit difficult to explain. I think that we are always surprised when someone dies. I remember my grandfather dying. He spent several years dying, and we all knew that it could happen at any moment, but it still came as a surprise when it did. Compare this to my Grandmother, who had relatively few health problems, but quite suddenly died of a stroke, or my friend Robin who was quite a bit younger than I am, but died quite suddenly in a car accident earlier this year, and it really seems like my grandfather’s passing should have been much less painful. It was expected, we were even kind of waiting for it, but when he finally died I still couldn’t believe it anymore that I could when Robin died. I think that death, even when it’s expected, always comes as a surprise.

The man who died was a truly amazing man. He provided the foundation for everything else that I’ve learned and understood. More than anyone else, excepting God of course, this man taught me what it meant to grow in my knowledge of the Lord, and that is something that I will never forget. I’m hoping to be able to attend his funeral service this week, and I don’t really see any reason why I wouldn’t be able to go, unless I simply forget about it, which is entirely possible I suppose.

At the moment things are going fairly well for me. Yesterday was a wonderful day, even though I only got a couple hours of sleep on Saturday night, and I was able to thoroughly enjoy every part of it. I had the chance to tell my young friend at church how proud I am of her, and what an honor it has been to watch her grow into the young woman that she’s become. She seemed very happy to hear that. I got to have lunch with some wonderful friends, new and old, and I got to enjoy my afternoon with very little work to do. I also got to spend a very sweet hour with the Lord before the evening service.

I’m hoping that today goes as well, and it’s off to a fairly good start. There is a woman on eHarmony that seems fairly interested in me, though we’re still just beginning to get to know one another. I suppose that we’ll find out what will happen with that when it happens. There’s also a young lady who’s been coming to my church that I find myself somewhat interested in. However, I rather doubt that she would return my interest. I was interested in her once before, a couple of years ago, when I was in a very bad place, and I handled it very poorly. 

There is no way to know what will come in life. However, we can be sure that neither the good times, nor the bad times, will last forever. Much like the endless revolutions of the Earth create night and day, our lives revolve through a cycle of events that bring both wonders and horrors. However, we must seek God’s hand in all of them and pursue him.